News from Nautilus


Engaging Indigenous Knowledge in Synthesis Studies

Posted by on September 6, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

Engaging Indigenous Knowledge in Synthesis Studies

“My goal for the long run is to have healthy communities, healthy individuals, healthy Alaska. We deserve that.”      —Mike Williams, Akiak (SASAP working group member) Last week NII collaborated with the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and other partners in the State of Alaska Salmon and People project (SASAP) to review how indigenous knowledge has been engaged in SASAP to date and to develop guidelines for future studies of this type. The meeting, held in Anchorage, brought together 19 members of SASAP...

Kenai Roundtable: Salmon, Sustainability, and Culture

Posted by on August 30, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

Kenai Roundtable: Salmon, Sustainability, and Culture

Researchers from NII’s multi-partner project State of Alaska’s Salmon and People (SASAP) joined keynote speaker Chris Oliver, Asst. Administrator of NOAA Fisheries, last week on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula to discuss the intersection of salmon, science, policy, culture and industry. SASAP researchers Dr. Pete Rand and Dr. Krista Oke along with Data Task Force member Dr. Meagan Krupa presented their research at the Kenai River Sportfishing Association’s Kenai River Classic Roundtable on August 22 at Kenai Peninsula...

Investing in Alaska’s Maritime Economy

Posted by on August 13, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

Investing in Alaska’s Maritime Economy

Alaska’s 740,000 residents live in hundreds of communities, many of which are spread over more than 33,000 miles of coastline and 2,670 named islands. The Alaska Marine Highway System (AMHS) plays a key role connecting coastal communities and provides year-round ferry services between Bellingham (WA) and Dutch Harbor. Operated by the State of Alaska, the AMHS is part of the National Highway system and is a critical contributor to the Alaskan economy. From the vast quantity of goods shipped between hubs to the 350,000 residents and tourists...

Kenai Learning Exchange

Posted by on July 20, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

Kenai Learning Exchange

By Amy Lowndes Nautilus staff recently visited Alaska’s fishing hotspot, the Kenai Peninsula, to learn more about the area’s unique cultural, ecological, and policy issues from Kenai River’s diverse salmon stakeholders. The Kenai Peninsula is home to a wealth of salmon runs that support world-class sportfish and commercial fishing industries, several personal use fisheries, and an Educational Fishery set net belonging to the Kenaitze Indian Tribe. Nautilus’ Salmon and Communications Policy Intern Amy Lowndes, First...

Washington – Alaska Salmon Learning Exchange

Posted by on July 8, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

Washington – Alaska Salmon Learning Exchange

Nautilus staff recently organized the first Washington Alaska Salmon Learning Exchange, which brought together salmon leaders from both states to share salmon stories and efforts to ensure healthy salmon and people systems persist throughout the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. The goal of the four-day driving tour was to learn from the experiences of the many people working to restore depleted salmon populations in Washington and share our work to strengthen Alaska’s salmon and salmon-dependent communities through one of Nautilus’ main...

NII Volunteers Protect Kenai River Bank Habitat

Posted by on June 14, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

NII Volunteers Protect Kenai River Bank Habitat

Nautilus staff recently participated in a volunteer service day organized by Defenders of Wildlife Alaska and the US Forest Service to assist with stewardship of the Russian River. Working with a diverse group of volunteers, including Salmon Fellowship partners from the Alaska Humanities Forum, NII helped install some 3 kilometers of bank habitat protective netting, clean up rubbish and get fishing infrastructure ready for the 2018 season.   The Russian River area is one of the most heavily used streams in Alaska, with some 1,000...

Interdisciplinary Research Featured at Fisheries Meeting

Posted by on May 28, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

Interdisciplinary Research Featured at Fisheries Meeting

The Western Division of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) held its 43rd Annual Meeting in Anchorage from 21-25 May 2018. The meeting brought together some 500 fisheries scientists from across the USA and Canada and featured a diverse program of presentations, field trips and trade shows (https://wdmtg.fisheries.org/).     Nautilus staff Ian Dutton and contractor Madeline Jovanovich contributed to a 20-presentation SASAP (State of Alaska’s Salmon and People) symposium organized by SASAP partner Dr. Peter Westley (UAF). Jovanovich...

Building Resilient Communities and Natural Systems 

Posted by on May 11, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

Building Resilient Communities and Natural Systems 

Nautilus Principal Ian Dutton recently joined conservation coaches from more than 30 countries at the 2018 Conservation Coaches Network Rally (http://www.ccnetglobal.com/coach-rallies/ccnet-rally-2018-in-australia/).  The Rally is held every two years and brings together Open Standards Coaches (http://www.ccnetglobal.com/about-ccnet/) to share experience and explore new areas of practice.   This year’s meeting was held, for the first time, in Australia, which is especially appropriate given the widespread use of OS approaches there by...

Dialogues and Backdrops: Seeking Sustainable Salmon Systems

Posted by on April 30, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

Dialogues and Backdrops: Seeking Sustainable Salmon Systems

(April 2018, Southeast Alaska) It’s low tide in Petersburg and early spring migrants have just arrived–tiny yellow-rumped warblers that search the seaweed for invertebrates. Normally birds of the forest, it’s still too chilly for their mainstay diet, land-based insects. It’s the sea that provides for them now, as it has for the Tlingit for thousands of years, for Norwegian settlers a century ago, and for the fishers, shrimpers, crabbers, and packers who’ve since made this dramatic and remote location their home.  ...

Promoting Salmon Literacy

Posted by on April 17, 2018 in News from Nautilus | 0 comments

Promoting Salmon Literacy

Alaskans care deeply about salmon. A survey of 2,068 Alaskans by DHM for The Salmon Project revealed that nine out of 10 respondents viewed their connection to wild salmon as important — most viewed it as very important.  In the 2013 Salmon Project survey Alaskan Connections to the Wild Salmon Resources, Alaskans gave many reasons for their profound sense of connection to salmon: Nearly seven in 10 respondents felt “strongly connected” to wild salmon through eating and enjoyment of its taste and/or nutritional qualities More than nine...