News from Nautilus


Nautilus staff recently organized the first Washington Alaska Salmon Learning Exchange, which brought together salmon leaders from both states to share salmon stories and efforts to ensure healthy salmon and people systems persist throughout the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. The goal of the four-day driving tour was to learn from the experiences of the many people working to restore depleted salmon populations in Washington and share...

Nautilus staff recently participated in a volunteer service day organized by Defenders of Wildlife Alaska and the US Forest Service to assist with stewardship of the Russian River. Working with a diverse group of volunteers, including Salmon Fellowship partners from the Alaska Humanities Forum, NII helped install some 3 kilometers of bank habitat protective netting, clean up rubbish and get fishing infrastructure ready for the 2018...

The Western Division of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) held its 43rd Annual Meeting in Anchorage from 21-25 May 2018. The meeting brought together some 500 fisheries scientists from across the USA and Canada and featured a diverse program of presentations, field trips and trade shows (https://wdmtg.fisheries.org/).     Nautilus staff Ian Dutton and contractor Madeline Jovanovich contributed to a 20-presentation SASAP...

Nautilus Principal Ian Dutton recently joined conservation coaches from more than 30 countries at the 2018 Conservation Coaches Network Rally (http://www.ccnetglobal.com/coach-rallies/ccnet-rally-2018-in-australia/).  The Rally is held every two years and brings together Open Standards Coaches (http://www.ccnetglobal.com/about-ccnet/) to share experience and explore new areas of practice.   This year’s meeting was held, for the first...

(April 2018, Southeast Alaska) It’s low tide in Petersburg and early spring migrants have just arrived–tiny yellow-rumped warblers that search the seaweed for invertebrates. Normally birds of the forest, it’s still too chilly for their mainstay diet, land-based insects. It’s the sea that provides for them now, as it has for the Tlingit for thousands of years, for Norwegian settlers a century ago, and for the...

Promoting Salmon Literacy

Promoting Salmon Literacy


Posted By on April 17, 2018

Alaskans care deeply about salmon. A survey of 2,068 Alaskans by DHM for The Salmon Project revealed that nine out of 10 respondents viewed their connection to wild salmon as important — most viewed it as very important.  In the 2013 Salmon Project survey Alaskan Connections to the Wild Salmon Resources, Alaskans gave many reasons for their profound sense of connection to salmon: Nearly seven in 10 respondents felt “strongly...